Celebrate your favorite peace & nonviolent justice activist or organization by nominating them for FOR’s 2014 Peace Awards! http://forusa.org/about/awards

Celebrate your favorite peace & nonviolent justice activist or organization by nominating them for FOR’s 2014 Peace Awards! http://forusa.org/about/awards

Statement from the International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers for World Water Day March 22nd 2014: As a means of sisterhood, motherhood, and womanhood, please join the International Council of the Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers with strong beautiful prayers being held all around the world by many for the healing of our waters, our Mother Earth and humanity. We thank all those who join us as we pray for the life of water for our future generations. Prepare a bowl of clean water or stand beside a body of water.  Please pray for the water in apology (for polluting and disrespect. Then offer prayers of love, gratitude and respect. Hold both of your hands toward the water, from your heart your energy will be projected into the water through your hands. (you can close your eyes during this process) Please intend that the vibrations, which now fill the water will spread to the waters all over our Mother Earth. You may also add your own prayer to the water, meditation, chanting, music, songs, dancing, and so on intending the same purpose. Each person can bring a bottle of their drinking water, and when the ceremony is complete – each one will pour a little bit of the drinking water on their hand, with a loving thought, sprinkle the water away from you (as in spreading Seeds), then drink the water, with a feeling of gratitude. For more information visit www.inthenameofthemother.net#INTHENAMEOFTHEMOTHER

Statement from the International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers for World Water Day March 22nd 2014:

As a means of sisterhood, motherhood, and womanhood, please join the International Council of the Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers with strong beautiful prayers being held all around the world by many for the healing of our waters, our Mother Earth and humanity.
We thank all those who join us as we pray for the life of water for our future generations.

Prepare a bowl of clean water or stand beside a body of water.
Please pray for the water in apology (for polluting and disrespect. Then offer prayers of love, gratitude and respect.
Hold both of your hands toward the water, from your heart your energy will be projected into the water through your hands. (you can close your eyes during this process)
Please intend that the vibrations, which now fill the water will spread to the waters all over our Mother Earth.
You may also add your own prayer to the water, meditation, chanting, music, songs, dancing, and so on intending the same purpose.
Each person can bring a bottle of their drinking water, and when the ceremony is complete – each one will pour a little bit of the drinking water on their hand, with a loving thought, sprinkle the water away from you (as in spreading Seeds), then drink the water, with a feeling of gratitude.

For more information visit www.inthenameofthemother.net
#INTHENAMEOFTHEMOTHER

mercycorps:

Our field staff do such amazing work. Meet Ghassan, who’s working to support Syrian refugee kids in Lebanon. 
Ghassan is passionate about empowering communities to help themselves through conflict. His gentle poise and easy smile make him well-loved across neighborhoods and nationalities — an ideal mentor for both the volunteers he recruits and the kids he helps through the difficult months ahead. Read more.

mercycorps:

Our field staff do such amazing work. Meet Ghassan, who’s working to support Syrian refugee kids in Lebanon. 

Ghassan is passionate about empowering communities to help themselves through conflict. His gentle poise and easy smile make him well-loved across neighborhoods and nationalities — an ideal mentor for both the volunteers he recruits and the kids he helps through the difficult months ahead. Read more.

Voices FOR Peace: “Nothing happens in my country without consulting the women. Our wise people, our elders, they are like libraries. We consult them whenever we need to make large decisions. Every five years, in my country, it is the women who make a peace march. It is the grandmothers who for one month go into the forest to prepare for this peace march. They fast, they pray and invoke the ancestors. When the grandmothers speak, the president listens.” ~ Grandmother Bernadette Rebienot Born in Libreville, Gabon of the Omyene linguistic community, widow and mother of ten, grandmother of twenty-three. Before retiring, Bernadette worked as an educator and school administrator. Bernadette has participated in numerous national and international conferences on Traditional Medicine. She is a healer, master of the Iboga Bwiti Rite and master of Women’s Initiations. Bernadette has offered initiations and consultations for the past thirty years. She has been President of the Association of Traditional Medicine Practitioners for Gabonese Health (U.T.S.G.) since 1994.

Voices FOR Peace:
“Nothing happens in my country without consulting the women. Our wise people, our elders, they are like libraries. We consult them whenever we need to make large decisions. Every five years, in my country, it is the women who make a peace march. It is the grandmothers who for one month go into the forest to prepare for this peace march. They fast, they pray and invoke the ancestors. When the grandmothers speak, the president listens.”
~ Grandmother Bernadette Rebienot

Born in Libreville, Gabon of the Omyene linguistic community, widow and mother of ten, grandmother of twenty-three. Before retiring, Bernadette worked as an educator and school administrator. Bernadette has participated in numerous national and international conferences on Traditional Medicine. She is a healer, master of the Iboga Bwiti Rite and master of Women’s Initiations. Bernadette has offered initiations and consultations for the past thirty years. She has been President of the Association of Traditional Medicine Practitioners for Gabonese Health (U.T.S.G.) since 1994.

Voices FOR Peace: “We are here with a prayer for our generations, for our grandchildren who are suffering, for our children’s grandchildren. How are we going to survive? Our government is taking everything from us. Our people want our Black Hills back. The only way to survive is through prayer.” ~ Grandmother Beatrice Long-Visitor Holy Dance Lakota keeper of the traditional ways, great grandmother, Native American Church elder, sundancer, healthworker for people with diabetes. Beatrice is a member of the Council of Language Elders, focusing on Oglala Lakota language immersion and teaching their native tongue to children and to elders.

Voices FOR Peace:
“We are here with a prayer for our generations, for our grandchildren who are suffering, for our children’s grandchildren. How are we going to survive? Our government is taking everything from us. Our people want our Black Hills back. The only way to survive is through prayer.”
~ Grandmother Beatrice Long-Visitor Holy Dance

Lakota keeper of the traditional ways, great grandmother, Native American Church elder, sundancer, healthworker for people with diabetes. Beatrice is a member of the Council of Language Elders, focusing on Oglala Lakota language immersion and teaching their native tongue to children and to elders.

Voices FOR Peace: “From the getgo, this council originated from the Spirit World. Every one of us has been called. Through our prayers, we can touch the hearts of the people. We can help stop spiritual blindness around the world. Our prayers can be brought from the four corners of the world for this work. We can be the voice of strength, encouragement, and love, fighting for peace. Remember, even water dripping on a rock can make a difference.”  ~ Grandmother Agnes Baker Pilgrim The oldest living member of her tribe, the Takelma Indians, originally from Southern Oregon. Agnes is a world renowned spiritual leader, member of the Historic Society and keeper of the Sacred Salmon Ceremony.

Voices FOR Peace:
“From the getgo, this council originated from the Spirit World. Every one of us has been called. Through our prayers, we can touch the hearts of the people. We can help stop spiritual blindness around the world. Our prayers can be brought from the four corners of the world for this work. We can be the voice of strength, encouragement, and love, fighting for peace. Remember, even water dripping on a rock can make a difference.”
~ Grandmother Agnes Baker Pilgrim
The oldest living member of her tribe, the Takelma Indians, originally from Southern Oregon. Agnes is a world renowned spiritual leader, member of the Historic Society and keeper of the Sacred Salmon Ceremony.

Grandmother Aama Bombo Buddhi Maya Lama, who is also known as Aama Bombo (Mother Shaman), was born in the remote village of Melong in the Eastern part of the Bagmati Zone, Nepal, 65 years ago. Her father was a renowned shaman in the Nepalese Tamang tradition. Aama became a shaman in spite of the Tamang tradition that women are not supposed to practice shamanism. In the early days, her father restricted her in every way from practicing shamanism. However, when her father died at the age of eighty, his spirits and other gods and spirits started visiting and teaching her to be a shaman, against the prevailing cultural values of Tamang society. Today, Aama has achieved great renown in Nepal. She treats around 100 patients every morning at her house in Boudhnath, near Kathmandu. Patients come to visit her from around the country, as well as from India and Tibet. She does not discriminate against those she heals, treating the poorest of the poor as well as the Royal Family of Nepal with equal dedication and respect.

Grandmother Aama Bombo

Buddhi Maya Lama, who is also known as Aama Bombo (Mother Shaman), was born in the remote village of Melong in the Eastern part of the Bagmati Zone, Nepal, 65 years ago. Her father was a renowned shaman in the Nepalese Tamang tradition. Aama became a shaman in spite of the Tamang tradition that women are not supposed to practice shamanism. In the early days, her father restricted her in every way from practicing shamanism. However, when her father died at the age of eighty, his spirits and other gods and spirits started visiting and teaching her to be a shaman, against the prevailing cultural values of Tamang society.

Today, Aama has achieved great renown in Nepal. She treats around 100 patients every morning at her house in Boudhnath, near Kathmandu. Patients come to visit her from around the country, as well as from India and Tibet. She does not discriminate against those she heals, treating the poorest of the poor as well as the Royal Family of Nepal with equal dedication and respect.

On Tuesday,October 29th, at 7:00PM, FOR will present the International Pfeffer Peace Award to the International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers at an event at the Albert Schweitzer Institute of Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Connecticut. This event is free and open to the public. The Grandmothers’ Council will be represented by five or six of the Grandmothers. In anticipation of the awards presentation, FOR will honor all Thirteen Grandmothers by posting a Grandmother’s bio a day. We hope you will enjoy. (photo: 2nd Council in 2005 at Pojoaque Pueblo, New Mexico)

On Tuesday,October 29th, at 7:00PM, FOR will present the International Pfeffer Peace Award to the International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers at an event at the Albert Schweitzer Institute of Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Connecticut. This event is free and open to the public.
The Grandmothers’ Council will be represented by five or six of the Grandmothers. In anticipation of the awards presentation, FOR will honor all Thirteen Grandmothers by posting a Grandmother’s bio a day. We hope you will enjoy.
(photo: 2nd Council in 2005 at Pojoaque Pueblo, New Mexico)

Voices FOR Peace: “When we become an example of balance and inner peace, even just with our partner, children, or friends, we are healing the planet.”  ~ Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers (photo: the first council in 2004 at Menla Mountain Retreat in the Catskills, NY)

Voices FOR Peace:
“When we become an example of balance and inner peace, even just with our partner, children, or friends, we are healing the planet.”
~ Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers
(photo: the first council in 2004 at Menla Mountain Retreat in the Catskills, NY)